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Our question

What are the consequences of the ‘Law on the Protection of Minors against the Detrimental Effect of Public Information’?
Censorship of informational gay websites
Moral damage to the LGBT community
Second class citizenship
Increased discrimination at schools
No consequences at all

News

2010 11 15
Lithuanian parliament seeks to ban gay prides
Lithuania's parliament on Friday decided to go ahead with legislation imposing fines for the "public promotion of homosexual relations".
 
The new Article in the Administrative Code is entitled “Public promotion of homosexual relations“ and states that “public promotion of homosexual relations is to be punished by a fine from two thousand to ten thousand litas  (€580 - €2900, $792 - $3955)".
 
In a first reading on Friday, 31 legislators voted in favour and seven were against the draft law.   
 
The aim of this draft according to explanatory letter of the initiators is “to assert that there would be administrative responsibility for public defiance of just and harmonious society values, and public encouragement to score them.“
 
MP Petras Grazulis argues that this proposal is implementing the Law on the Protection of Minors against the Detrimental Effect of Public Information, legally enacted in March this year.
 
During the recent Parliament hearing and in the television programming broadcasted afterwards, MP Grazulis stated that this amendment is necessary to protect traditional family values and morals of society. He directly stated that one of the important aims the amendment it is to prevent events like Baltic Pride from being held in Lithuania in the future.
 
“We are deeply concerned that the proposed amendments to the Administrative Code will violate the human rights of freedom of expression and assembly, and will heighten the levels of inequality and discrimination of LGBT people in Lithuania.” – said Vladimir Simonko, Chairman of the Lithuanian Gay League (LGL) and one of the co-organizers of the 2010 Baltic gay pride.
 
Two more votes are needed to approve the controversial law, with the second reading expected in December.
e-solution: gaumina